Scholars

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Dr Alexis Brassey
is a PhD candidate in law at the University of Cambridge. His main areas of interest are tax, constitutional law and jurisprudence. His current research is focussed on the General Anti Abuse Rule, GAAR (FA 2013, ss206-215) and the rule of law. This research investigates the GAAR by examining the extent to which general principles of law interact with concepts such as legal certainty. Alex holds a MA in Philosophy from Kings College, London, a LLM in Corporate Law from the College of Law and a PhD in Psychology from IoE, UCL. He is a qualified teacher, solicitor, notary and fund manager. He spent many years in the City of London working in senior management for a number of investment banks such as Lehman Brothers, Citibank, Sakura Bank, BZW (Barclays Capital) and SMFC.

Email: anb41@cam.ac.uk

Website

 

morten_broberg.jpgProfessor Morten Broberg is a visiting Fellow at the Lauterpacht Centre. He is a Professor of International Development Law at the University of Copenhagen and holds the Faculty’s Jean Monnet Chair (the European Union and the Developing Countries). Professor Broberg’s research is focused upon European Union law in general as well as on the relations between the European Union and the developing countries. During his stay at the Lauterpacht Centre, Professor Broberg will primarily work on an analysis of the regulation of the European Union’s relations with the developing countries; with regards to development assistance and humanitarian aid as well as with regards to trade.

Email: Morten.broberg@jur.ku.dk

Research Interests: Legal aspects of EU-developing countries relations

Website


Dr. Dominic de Cogan is a University Lecturer and Fellow of Christ’s College.  He was previously a Leverhulme funded Early Career Research Fellow at Birmingham Law School (to 2014), a PhD candidate at Downing College, Cambridge (to 2011) and a Tax Consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers in Cambridge, Birmingham and London (to 2008).  His research interests centre on the interactions between tax law, public law and political theory, especially as they play out over extended periods of time.  In his recent work, he has examined local land taxation, co-operative compliance, the role of conservatism in tax reform and the approach of judges to interpretation in cases of tax avoidance.  Dominic has lectured Equity Law since starting in Birmingham in 2011 and also has teaching experience in Administrative Law, Constitutional Law and Business Law.  Outside work, Dominic is a keen amateur musician and father to an overactive 4-year old.

Email: dad34@cam.ac.uk

Research Interests: Tax Administration, Tax Law, Tax History, Political Theory, Local Government

 Website

Dr. Alfred Duncan is a Lecturer in Financial Economics at the University of Kent and formerly Fellow at Christ’s College. He completed his Doctoral studies at the University of Glasgow. Alfred’s research interests include macroeconomics and public finance, including the interaction between tax policies and the frequency and magnitude of financial crises. Alfred has professional experience in fixed income and regulation relating to the financial sector and network industries.

Email: a.duncan-622@kent.ac.uk

Research Interests: Economics, Macroeconomics, Banking and Finance, Bitcoin and Distributed Ledgers

Website

 

mayhedMay Hen is a PhD student at the University of Cambridge, Jesus College. She is currently in her second year reading economic sociology in the Department of Sociology. She is interested in offshore financial centres. May is actively involved in all aspects of international research and dialogue on anti-corruption, taxation, tax research in the social sciences, and fiscal anthropology of tax. She is interested in all things tax: 1) How it makes people behave, 2) How industries are formed around interpretation of it, and 3) How in the pursuit of 1) and 2) can influence the culture of indigenous populations. For her PhD, May will study three British Overseas Territories in the Caribbean region: The Cayman Islands, Bermuda, and the British Virgin Islands, in order to understand how expatriates and indigenous populations have transformed themselves from maritime economies in to powerful finance-based economies, and what the future might hold for each of the three islands.

Email: hmh46@cam.ac.uk

Research Interests: Offshore Financial Centres, Bitcoin and Distributed Ledgers

Website

hileman_garrick-3Dr Garrick Hileman is a Senior Research Associate at the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance and a Researcher at the Centre for Macroeconomics. He was recently ranked as one of the 100 most influential economists in the UK and Ireland and he is regularly asked to share his research and perspective with the FT, BBC, CNBC, WSJ, Sky News, and other media. Garrick has been invited to present his research on monetary and financial innovation to government organisations, including central banks and war colleges, as well as private firms such as Visa, Black Rock, and UBS. Garrick has 20 years’ private sector experience with both startups and established companies such as Visa, Lloyd’s of London, Bank of America, The Home Depot, and Allianz. Garrick’s technology experience includes co-founding a San Francisco-based tech incubator, IT strategy consulting for multinationals, and founding MacroDigest, which employs a proprietary algorithm to cluster trending economic analysis and perspective.

Email: g.hileman@jbs.cam.ac.uk

Research interests: Macroeconomics, cryptocurrencies, alternative finance

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Christian Holm is a Bachelors student at the University of Cambridge, Christ’s College. He is currently undertaking his third year reading Economics at the Faculty of Economics. He is interested in tax-policymaking, particularly looking into tax created incentive. Christian is engaged in politics and worked through the budget process of 2016 as a Political Advisor in the Parliament of Sweden. Currently Christian is conducting his dissertation in co-operation with the UK Cabinet Office looking into the effects of the Community First programme launched by the government in 2010.

Email: ch680@cam.ac.uk

Research interests: Economics, Microeconomics and Public Economics.

 

Screen Shot 2016-03-08 at 3.11.56 PM.pngChris Jenkins is a PhD candidate in law at Trinity College, Cambridge. He has three main areas of expertise: Private International Law, taxation, and Indian legal history. Combining these interests, his current research uncovers historical examples of the processes and structures of interactions between legal systems, usefully compared with the EU. His research is entitled: ‘A Stream of Tendency’: The Evolution of Interactions between Legal Systems in Colonial India. It focuses on the legal interactions between British India and the semi-independent Princely States, singling out the regime for the free movement of ‘foreign’ commercial judgments and relief from double taxation as examples of a ‘tendency’ towards common or interlocking laws and institutions.

Chris graduated with a BCom (Economics) and a LLB (Hons) from Auckland University, New Zealand, in 2011. He then worked as a solicitor in the litigation and tax teams at Russell McVeagh, Auckland, leaving in 2012 to undertake postgraduate studies as a Woolf Fisher Scholar at Cambridge University. He completed his LLM in 2013, with his thesis supervised by Professor Peter Harris, and stayed on as a PhD candidate, under the supervision of Professor Christopher Forsyth.

His other research interests include the history of the Indian income tax, and the interpretation of tax statutes, as well as Commonwealth legal history, especially examples of legal co-ordination.

Research interests: Private International Law, taxation, legal history, tax treaties, Indian taxation, tax avoidance.

Website

Email: clj38@cam.ac.uk

Dr. Matteo MantovaniM Mantovani.jpg is a PhD candidate at the Faculty of Law of the University of Cambridge. He previously was at the University of Perugia where he graduated in Economics, completed his PhD in Economics and read Economy of the EU and Land Economy. He also gained an MA in taxation from the University of London. He became a chartered accountant and worked as a tax advisor for more than a decade in a Rome-based Tax Law Firm where he is still an associate specialising in VAT. He has been a consultant in both the private and the public sector and in 2014 was appointed as a deputy member of the EU Commission VAT Expert Group. Matteo’s research interests include the interaction of VAT systems across the world with specific reference to the implementation of the destination principle, the exploitation of offshore business structures, the fight against international fraud and the BEPS phenomenon, the taxation of digital economy and intangible assets in a cross border scenario.

Email: mm2104@cam.ac.uk

Research Interests:  VAT and European Tax Law

IMG_8163 (2).jpgFélix D. Martínez is a PhD Candidate and Research and Teaching Assistant at the Tax Law Department of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain). He is a visiting PhD student at the University of Cambridge. His PhD studies focus on double non-taxation, hybrid financial instruments and linking rules in the light of the recent initiatives carried out by the OECD, the EU and different national Parliaments. Closely connected to the main topic of the thesis are public international law, corporate law and accounting law, among others. He has other fields of interest as local taxation and economics in general.  He has different publications on national and international tax law and he has participated in different national and international events. He has been also visiting researcher at the Institute for Austrian and International Tax Law (WU-Vienna) under an Ernst Mach Grant and at the International Bureau of Fiscal Documentation (IBFD) (Amsterdam).

Email: felixdaniel.martinez@uam.es

Research interests: international taxation, business financing, corporate and accounting law, corporate taxation and local taxation.

Website

Peacock_tax_profile_pic.JPGClaire Peacock is a DPhil (Phd) candidate in International Relations at the University of Oxford, and is currently a visiting research student at the Faculty of Law at Cambridge. Her Phd research is on the regulation of human and labour rights practices through provisions in free trade agreements. Claire’s other main research interest is on the offshore financial system’s role in international relations, including how to recognise when offshore accounts are used for licit and illicit reasons, and the design (and effectiveness) of tax treaties.
Email: claire.peacock@politics.ox.ac.uk
Research Interests: International Taxation, Offshore Financial Centres, Network Analysis

 

 

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Kim Willey is a PhD student at the University of Cambridge, Trinity Hall College. Kim has an LL.B. and M.B.A from the University of Victoria and a Masters in Law from Osgoode Hall at York University in Toronto, Canada. She is currently in her first year with the Faculty of Law. Kim’s research is in the area of corporate law and focuses on short-termism in equity markets. Specifically, Kim is looking into the assertion that equity markets are becoming increasingly myopic and focused on short-term financial results at the expense of long-term value creation. Kim’s work in this area includes analyzing reform proposals which intend to use tax policy, in particular financial transaction taxes and capital gains reductions, to counter the perceived harms of short-termism. Prior to starting her research, Kim had over a decade in private practice as a corporate lawyer advising clients on international transactions, both in Bermuda and Canada.

E:mail:kmw53@cam.ac.uk

Research Interests: Corporate Transactions and Taxation