All posts by May Hen

PhD student at University of Cambridge.

Invitation to Cambridge.tax garden party June 9th

We would like to extend an invitation for you to attend one of our sessions followed by a garden party in Jesus College. All are welcome. Our regular weekly meeting will be held in the Jesus College MCR (Middle Combination Room) from 12pm-1pm followed by a garden party in the Cloisters/Chapel Court from 1pm-4pm. The cost of catering, which includes lunch and drinks, will be £ 30. Please contact May Hen at hmh46@cam.ac.uk if you are interested in attending. We look forward to seeing you.

 

Summary of our last meeting with Tarrant Green

Last week, Tarrant Green came to discuss  “An Interactive Seminar on the Law and Practice of Tax Investigations” where he discussed a particularly long and difficult case between a former client and HMRC that was fraught with administrative difficulties. We were given the opportunity to take a peek into a tax practitioner’s experience with HMRC but also a case that had elements of a criminal enforcement agencies’ involvement. The study of tax can be quite exciting when ‘tales from the front lines’ are brought to life through the discussion of a long-time practitioner’s personal experience of a case. It brings together several complexities that are sometimes hard to articulate to a general audience. I found Tarrant’s talk to be both interesting and engaging with the group of us who come from all sorts of disciplines. Looking forward to more exciting speakers and chats in the coming months. This is also an open invitation to any of our readers to come by for a meeting or social!

May

Cambridge Centre for Tax Law Conference

Today the Cambridge Centre for Tax Law put on a spectacular 1-day conference on the role of judges in developing the context of tax law. The presenters and discussants provided some exceptional presentations and commentary on a range of topics. Dominic de Cogan did an excellent job of organizing this inaugural event. Chris Jenkins provided a thoughtful presentation on the role of judges in influencing tax outcomes. Ewa Plesnar presented a poster on tax and human rights. And Matteo Mantovani presented a poster on VAT and BEPs.

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Below is a summary of the conference outline:

Tax Policy Conference 2016: The role of judges in developing the content of tax law

Wednesday 13 April 2016

Lloyd’s Room, Christ’s College

10.00-10.30am: Registration and tea/coffee

10.30-11.15am: John Avery Jones (Pump Court/UT/FTT), ‘Is tax all the same?’
Chair: John Snape (Warwick)
Discussant: Judge Colin Bishopp (President, FTT)
Discussant: Judge Roger Berner (UT)

11.15-11.50am: Tobias Franz (Münster), ‘The General Anti-Abuse Rule proposed by the European Commission’
Discussant: Christiana HJI Panayi (QMUL)

1.50am-12.10pm: Tea/coffee break

12.10-12.45pm: Chris Jenkins (Cambridge), ‘Implied terms and taxation’
Chair: Judith Freedman (Oxford)
Discussant: Johann Hattingh (Cape Town)

12.45-1.45pm: Lunch

1.45-2.30pm: Judge Malcolm Wallis (Supreme Court of Appeal of SA), ‘Is tax really different’
Chair: Judith Freedman (Oxford)
Discussant: Sir Stephen Oliver QC (Retired president, FTT)

2.30-2.50pm: Tea/coffee break

2.50-3.25pm: Stephen Daly (Oxford), ‘Judicial review and tax exceptionalism: recent trends’
Chair: Penelope Tuck (Birmingham)
Discussant: Hans Gribnau (Leiden/Tilburg)

3.25-4.10pm: Kristin Hickman (Minnesota), ‘Treasury’s Retroactivity’
Discussant: Dominic de Cogan (Cambridge)

4.10-4.30pm: Closing discussion

 

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Summary of February 11th and 16th meetings

On February 11th we were joined by Morten Broberg, a visiting fellow at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law and Nikodem Szumilo, a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Land Economy. We discussed Nikodem’s work in real estate finance and the tax implications regarding property transfers.

DSC_6143On February 16th we were visited by Rodrigo Ormeno Perez, a Lecturer in the Department of Taxation and Accounting at the Birmingham Business School. His visit was sponsored by the Cambridge Centre for Tax Law. We discussed his research on elite formation in tax policy making, the nature of tax administrations, and the qualitative work he has done on tax authorities and effective policy-making.

We welcome the inclusion of our two new members are looking forward to having Rodrigo back again soon.

Welcome

cropped-dsc_5752.jpgWelcome to the homepage for the tax scholars group University of Cambridge! We meet weekly for an hour to talk about anything loosely related to tax. We are an open and interdisciplinary group and come from both academia, private sector, and public sector. Feel free to contact the group organizer, May, at hmh46@cam.ac.uk.